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Hours of Operation
Sun-Thurs 11am-11pm
Friday 11am-Midnight
Sat 11am-Midnight

923 West 7th
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
501-375-8466
vinos@vinosbrewpub.com

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BeerWords

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ADJUNCT:
An ingredient used in the making of beer that is not malted barley, water, yeast or hops.
AEROBIC:
The word used to describe an organism, such as a top-fermenting ale yeast, that needs oxygen to metabolize.
ALCOHOL:
The by-product of fermentation. The result of yeast metabolizing sugar.
ALCOHOL BY VOLUME:
A measurement of the alcohol content of a solution in terms of the percentage volume of alcohol per volume of beer.
ALCOHOL BY WEIGHT:
A measurement of the alcohol content of a solution in terms of the percentage weight of alcohol per volume of beer.
ALE:
A beverage made from malted barley, hops, and water, fermented with a top-fermenting (aerobic) yeast, at a relatively high temperature.
ALTBIER:
A style of beer from the Dusseldorf region of Germany that is fermented using a top fermenting yeast and cold conditioned.
ANAEROBIC:
A word used to describe an organism, such as a bottom-fermenting lager yeast, that is able to metabolize in the absence of oxygen.
ATTENUATION:
The degree to which a beer has fermented; the final gravity expressed as a percentage of the original specific gravity.
BARLEY:
A cereal grain that is malted for use in the grist that becomes the mash in the process of brewing beers.
BARLEYWINE:
A brew with a high original gravity such as Anchor Old Foghorn and Sierra Nevada Bigfoot.
BARREL:
A standard of measurement equal to 31 US gallons.
BEER:
A fermented beverage made from grain, hops, water, yeast, and, in some cases, additional adjuncts.
BITTER:
A subclassification of pale ale with less hop content and carbonation than a traditional pale ale.
BOCK:
A dark, strong lager, first brewed in the city of Einbeck in Bavaria, Germany. It was brewed to survive shipment throughout Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries.
BODY:
The consistency of the beer. It is signified as full-bodied, medium-bodied, or light-bodied and is used when comparing beers.
BREW KETTLE:
The vessel in which wort is boiled with the hops after mashing.
BREW PUB:
A microbrewery/restaurant where the beer is both brewed and sold for consumption.
BRIGHT TANK:
The pressurized fermentation vessel where the beer is kept, chilled and under pressure, until served or drawn off for bottling or kegging.
BROWN ALE:
A style of ale that is nutty in flavor, with mild hopping such as Newcastle Brown Ale.
CAMRA:
(CAMpaign for Real Ale), founded in 1971 too preserve the production of cask-conditioned beers and ales.
CARAMEL:
A cooked sugar that is used to add color and alcohol content to beer.
CARBON DIOXIDE:
The gas by-product of fermentation.
CASK:
A container for draft beer designed for dispensing at atmospheric pressure.
CREAM ALE:
A beer specific to North America, usually a lager-style product, light in flavor and color.
CONDITIONING:
The process that causes beer to become effervescent.
DEXTRIN:
The unfermentable sugar developed during the mash. It gives the "mouth feel" to a beer.
DORTMUNDER:
A malty, rich, lightly hopped lager beer with a golden color that is lighter and less aromatic than a pilsner.
DRAFT (Draught):
The process of dispensing beer from a bright tank, cask, or keg.
DUNKEL:
From the German word meaning "dark", is usually used in terms of Weiss beers.
ENZYMES:
Catalysts found naturally in the grain of barley. When heated they convert the starches into sugars used in making beer.
ESTERS:
Aromatic oils that are the by-products of fermentation.
FRAMBOISE:
A Belgian lambic in which ripe raspberries have been added.
GRAVITY (specific gravity):
The amount of materials (usually sugars) in ratio to a specific measure of water expressed as a percentage.
GRIST:
The crushed grains used to make a mash.
GUEUZE:
A blend of young and old lambic beers that are allowed to ferment in the bottle.
HEFE-:
A German word meaning "with". Used mostly in conjunction with wheat beers to denote bottling or kegging with yeast in suspension (unfiltered).
HOP:
The flowering herb used to flavor and preserve beer.
INDIA PALE ALE:
The name give to a high-gravity pale ale intentionally well hopped so that it could survive the long voyage from the U.K. to the far-reaching military and economic outposts of the British Empire.
KEG:
One-half barrel, or 15.5 gallons U.S. KRAEUSEN: The addition of fermenting wort to a fermented beer during lagering.
KRIEK:
A Belgian lambic beer fermented with ripe cherries.
LAGER:
A German word meaning, "to store".
LAMBIC:
A beer from Belgium that is the result of fermentation of malted barley and malted wheat by ambient yeast.
LIQUOR:
The brewer's word for water used in brewing.
MAIOBCK:
A strong beer traditionally brewed in the spring to last in "lager" until the fall.
MALT(ing):
A process that develops the starch content of grain by allowing it to sprout and then stopping the sprouting by heating the grain.
MALT EXTRACT:
The condensed wort from a mash.
MALT LIQUOR:
A legal term use to designate a fermented malt beverage of relatively high alcohol content (usually 7%-8% by volume).
MALTOSE:
The sugar derived from mashing barley malt.
MARZEN:
Similar to a Vienna-style beer, brewed for the Oktoberfest in Munich, that is amber in color and semidry.
MASH:
The combination of grist and liquor heated to a specific temperature.
MICROBREWERY:
A small brewery that usually produces less than 250,000 barrels of beer per year.
MOUTH FEEL:
The experience of feeling the body of the beer while tasting it.
OKTOBERFEST:
Held in Munich in 1810 to celebrate the wedding of Prince Luitpold of Bavaria and Princess Teressa. It has been celebrated each year since.
PALE ALE:
A traditional beer brewed in the U.K., which is amber-colored, and very lightly hopped.
PLZEN:
The name of the Czech city that first began brewing Pilsner.
PITCHING:
The action of adding yeast to chilled wort for fermentation.
PORTER:
Similar to stout, but lighter, with very deep color and a smooth flavor.
RAUCHBIER:
A German word used to describe beer made from malted barley that has been smoked in a way similar to the process used in Scotland to produce smoked grain for the production of Scotch whiskey.
SCOTCH ALE:
A strong, sweet, full-bodied ale brewed in Scotland that is much closer to a lager-style beer due to low fermentation temperature and long fermentation time.
SPECIFIC GRAVITY:
See "Gravity"
STEAM BEER:
Indigenous to San Francisco, this amber beer supposedly got its name from the process of rebunging of beer kegs. During the process the fermenting beer would erupt from the bunghole and was called steam by the brewers.
STOUT:
A name for very dark porters, which was adopted by Guinness brewing company in Ireland.
TRAPPIST ALES:
Top-fermented, bottle-conditioned, slightly sweet ales brewed by Trappist monks.
VIENNA BEER:
An amber lager that was the toast of Vienna, Austria in the 19th century.
WEISSE:
A German word meaning "white" or "Wheat", depending on the context.
WORT:
The sweet liquid made up of maltose, liquor, and hop flavoring, which is fermented to make beer.
YEAST:
A single-celled fungus of the genus Saccharomyces.

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